Select Page

Capitol Riot Pleas and Sentencing

Yesterday a Trump supporter from Florida, Paul Allard Hodgkins was the first defendant charged with a felony to be sentenced for the January 6 attack on the US Capitol.

Judge Randolph Moss imposed a prison term of 8 months, less than the 18 months the government requested. Before sentence was imposed, Hodgkins addressed the judge telling him that he had stopped drinking, joined a church, gave blood, was doing community service and participating in a therapy program.

It also seems that Hodgkins is a cat lover.

Last month another participant in the Capitol riot, 49-year-old grandmother Anna Morgan-Lloyd pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to probation.

Sentencing of Anna Morgan-Lloyd for her part in January 6 attack on US Capitol / judge Royce Lamberth

In what is being called the largest criminal investigation in US history over 500 people have been charged. And with tens of thousands of hours of video evidence these cases will drag on for a long time to come.

US District judge Amit Mehta holds hearing for dozen Oath Keepers

Proud Boy Charles Donohoe arraignment via zoom

Proud Boys leaders Ethan Nordean and Joe Biggs appear via zoom before US District judge Timothy J. Kelly

 

 

Impeachment Trial Redux

Senate page hands question to parliamentarian

The second impeachment trial of now former president Trump took but five days, four of which are documented in these few sketches. Access to the Senate gallery was restricted because of the COVID19 pandemic which meant that we were rotated in for about twenty minutes every couple hours or so. Nevertheless the staff of the Radio-TV gallery were incredibly helpful and accommodating as always. I just hope to never sketch another impeachment.

One third of GOP seats empty during House managers’ args

Sen. Hawley ( feet up? )

House manager Rep. Swalwell and Republican senators

Senators Burr ( no socks ) and Fischer

Empty public gallery

Senators Cassidy ( taking notes ) and Cruz

Lindsey Graham has first GOP question

GOP Senator Braun reading magazine during House managers’ closing argument.

Trump defense attorney Michael Van Der Veen and House manager Stacy Plaskett shortly before announcement of stipulation on witness.

Senators huddle following vote to allow witnesses.

 

Sketches From the November Session

With one third of the Supreme Court now comprised of Trump appointed justices there was fear that last Tuesday’s election might end up being decided by the justices. That now seems unlikely given the margins, much to the relief of the Court I imagine.

The Justices continue to hear arguments by telephone conference, though probably not on the receivers pictured above. Below are sketches done from photos arguing counsel were kind enough to send me.

Sarah M. Harris for petitioner

Sanjay Narayan for respondent

David M. Shapiro for petitioner

Mississippi Deputy Solicitor General Krissy C. Nobile

Kannon Shanmugam for petitioner

Neal Katyal for repondents

Lori Windham, with co-counsel Mark Rienzi, for petitioner

David Zimmer for petitioner

Patrick M. Jaicomo for respondent

Texas Solictor General Kyle D. Hawkins

California Solicitor General Michael J. Mongan

 

Roger Stone Sentencing

Roger Stone’s sentencing became big news when, last week, all four Justice Department lawyers who had prosecuted the case quit after their sentencing memorandum was withdrawn the day after Trump tweeted that it was unfair and too harsh. Attorney General Barr said there was no communication with the White House on the decision to intervene, and went so far as to protest (methinks too much?) that the president’s tweeting made it difficult for him to do his job. A new watered-down sentencing recommendation was produced, and signed by Assistant US Attorney John Crabb.

Asked by Judge Amy Berman Jackson whether he actually wrote the second filing, AUSA Crabb demurred saying, “I’m not at liberty to discuss the internal deliberations in DOJ.”

In the end Judge Jackson imposed a sentence of forty months, well below the seven to nine years initially recommended, but not before chastising at length both Stone and the Department of Justice.

 

Senate Impeachment Sketches, Part II

Here are the final sketches from the Trump impeachment trial, plus a few from the State of the Union the night before the final vote, created on assignment for the New York They appear with commentary on the NYT site here.

Correction: These are not actually the cubbyholes used by senators, those are in the cloakrooms.