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SCOTUS February Sketches

After sketching Justice Ginsburg’s return to the bench on the first day of the Court’s February sitting I wimped out the second day because of a little bit of snow. I’m not nearly as tough as RBG. I’m also way more lazy which is why I’m only now getting it together to lump all the rest of February’s sketches into this one post.

Last week’s argument calendar started off with a First Amendment public-access TV case, Manhattan Community Access Corp. v. Halleck . . .

On Tuesday an argument on the constitutionality of a sex-offender law, United States v. Haymond . . .

. . . and lunch.

The big argument of a quiet month came on Wednesday in The American Legion v. American Humanist Associationan establishment clause case over a giant cross shaped WWI memorial in Bladensburg, Md, just outside DC.

Also on Wednesday, Justice Kagan had the opinion in a major death penalty case, Madison v. Alabama.

And, as if we needed further proof that RBG is no slouch, Justice Ginsburg on Monday announced her second and third opinions since returning to the bench, one of which was a case that she participated in through the briefs and argument transcript while recuperating from cancer surgery at home.

 

 

 

 

 

2017’s Leftover SCOTUS Sketches

Don’t know why I never posted this SCOTUSblog Halloween sketch. It’s a good one I think.

Another banner I neglected to post was inspired by the sports betting case, Christie v. NCAAI also failed to post the sketches from the argument and governor Christie’s swearing in to the bar.

I may be forgiven, it was a tough week. My mother was dying and I needed to be with her. That’s why I missed the arguments in Masterpiece Cakeshopthough I did produce a banner.

. . . with apologies to Wayne Thiebaud.

 

Of Course The Justices Don’t Do Politics

On Monday the Supreme Court heard a case on money, speech and unions. The argument in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association is over “agency fees” that public-sector unions, in this case the one representing California’s teachers, can charge non-members for negotiating on behalf of all workers. The non-union teachers in whose name the case was brought object to paying the fee because they say everything a government union negotiates is political, and therefor their First Amendment speech is hijacked.

Lawyer Michael Carvin argued the case for the petitioners – really for the Koch brothers funded Center for Individual Rights.

In the end, it appeared that a majority of the Justices will have no problem overturning the Court’s forty-year precedent.