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Sketches From the November Session

With one third of the Supreme Court now comprised of Trump appointed justices there was fear that last Tuesday’s election might end up being decided by the justices. That now seems unlikely given the margins, much to the relief of the Court I imagine.

The Justices continue to hear arguments by telephone conference, though probably not on the receivers pictured above. Below are sketches done from photos arguing counsel were kind enough to send me.

Sarah M. Harris for petitioner

Sanjay Narayan for respondent

David M. Shapiro for petitioner

Mississippi Deputy Solicitor General Krissy C. Nobile

Kannon Shanmugam for petitioner

Neal Katyal for repondents

Lori Windham, with co-counsel Mark Rienzi, for petitioner

David Zimmer for petitioner

Patrick M. Jaicomo for respondent

Texas Solictor General Kyle D. Hawkins

California Solicitor General Michael J. Mongan

 

A New Justice, A new Court

Halloween Banner / Justice Barrett

After a rushed and contentious partisan confirmation Justice Amy Coney Barrett will join the chief and associate justices to hear oral arguments tomorrow. And with the presidential election upon us there is a good chance we will soon have a sense of the new Court.

October “Sitting” Sketches

No justices were actually sitting in the courtroom on the first Monday of the October 2020 term, nor where any lawyers or the public. The Covid-19 pandemic has forced all of us to adapt to new conditions of social distancing. For the Supreme Court that has meant hearing arguments by conference call, with the bonus that the audio is live-streamed to the public. For me, while it’s great to listen to the arguments from the comfort of my studio, there’s not much to draw. At least there wasn’t until arguing counsel started sending me photos of their kitchen-table set-ups ( not really, at least not yet. But I’m hoping for a kitchen setting ). I’m enjoying the change after forty years of lawyers in suits arguing from the lectern.

From CUNY Law School, Ramzi Kassem argues for respondents

Deepak Gupta for respondent

Sean Marotta for petitioner

Stephen I. Vladeck for respondents

Kelsi B. Corkran for petitioner

Mark D. Standridge for respondents

Texas Solicitor General Kyle D. Hawkins

Nicholas J. Bronni, Arkansas Solicitor General petitioner

Craig Goldblatt for petitioner

Brian P. Goldman for petitioner

 

 

Summer of Covid SCOTUS Banners

Justices hear oral arguments by teleconference during coronavirus pandemic

SCOTUS statue ‘Contemplation of Justice” overlooks DC burning during riots following death of George Floyd

Goodbye Justice Ginsburg

After a week of memorials the beloved Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will join her late husband Marty at Arlington National Cemetery in a private ceremony.

I never got to meet the Notorious RBG. There were plans to visit her chambers and do watercolors of the jabots, but time ran out. My one off-the-bench memory of her is when she stopped by the press room for a chat during which she observed that DC drivers are the worst.

Posted here are some of the better sketches I’ve done of Justice Ginsburg ( there are plenty of lousy ones! ), along with a few SCOTUSblog banners done during the week of remembrance.

Justice Ginsburg with opinions in BNSF Railway Company and Fourth Estate Public Benefit Corp.

Brian T. Burgess for petitioner

Justice Ginsburg dissents in American Legion v. American Humanist Assoc.

Justice Ginsburg announces opinion in Virginia House of Delegates v. Bethune-Hill

Justice Alito with opinion in Hernandez v. Mesa

Justice Ginsburg dissents in Hernandez v. Mesa

 

Jeffrey Wall, Principal Deputy Solicitor General

Justice Ginsburg sporting “dissent” jabot?

Justice Ginsburg

SCOTUS Abortion and CFPB

Demonstrators on both sides of the abortion issue gathered outside the Supreme Court for yesterday’s argument in June Medical Services. The Center for Reproductive Rights distributed the teal colored knit caps shown in the banner sketch above. Below is a bird’s-eye ( drone’s-eye? ) view of the courtroom with virtually every seat filled for the argument. Actually, more seats were added in the aisles of the public section, and I should have added them.

On Tuesday, in Seila Law LLC v. CFPB, the Court heard argument on the constitutionality of the Consumer Financial Protection Board and whether the director of the board can be removed by the president “at will” or only “for cause”.

Also on Tuesday, the Court heard Liu v. SEC, for which I stuck around for one sketch.