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Capitol Riot Pleas and Sentencing

Yesterday a Trump supporter from Florida, Paul Allard Hodgkins was the first defendant charged with a felony to be sentenced for the January 6 attack on the US Capitol.

Judge Randolph Moss imposed a prison term of 8 months, less than the 18 months the government requested. Before sentence was imposed, Hodgkins addressed the judge telling him that he had stopped drinking, joined a church, gave blood, was doing community service and participating in a therapy program.

It also seems that Hodgkins is a cat lover.

Last month another participant in the Capitol riot, 49-year-old grandmother Anna Morgan-Lloyd pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to probation.

Sentencing of Anna Morgan-Lloyd for her part in January 6 attack on US Capitol / judge Royce Lamberth

In what is being called the largest criminal investigation in US history over 500 people have been charged. And with tens of thousands of hours of video evidence these cases will drag on for a long time to come.

US District judge Amit Mehta holds hearing for dozen Oath Keepers

Proud Boy Charles Donohoe arraignment via zoom

Proud Boys leaders Ethan Nordean and Joe Biggs appear via zoom before US District judge Timothy J. Kelly

 

 

Roger Stone Sentencing

Roger Stone’s sentencing became big news when, last week, all four Justice Department lawyers who had prosecuted the case quit after their sentencing memorandum was withdrawn the day after Trump tweeted that it was unfair and too harsh. Attorney General Barr said there was no communication with the White House on the decision to intervene, and went so far as to protest (methinks too much?) that the president’s tweeting made it difficult for him to do his job. A new watered-down sentencing recommendation was produced, and signed by Assistant US Attorney John Crabb.

Asked by Judge Amy Berman Jackson whether he actually wrote the second filing, AUSA Crabb demurred saying, “I’m not at liberty to discuss the internal deliberations in DOJ.”

In the end Judge Jackson imposed a sentence of forty months, well below the seven to nine years initially recommended, but not before chastising at length both Stone and the Department of Justice.

 

Roger Stone Trial

After just six days of testimony and closing arguments the fate of Roger Stone is in the hands of the jury this morning. It was an unusual trial from the start, but who would expect anything less when the defendant has a reputation for political dirty tricks going as far back as Watergate. He famously has the image of Richard Nixon tattooed on his back, after all. Nevertheless, in spite of a courtroom full of kooks, the trial progressed in an orderly and efficient manner. I wasn’t there every day, and unfortunately missed most of the witnesses’ testimony. Politico has a good story on the trial here.

Michael Flynn Status Hearing

At the same time Michael Flynn, Trump’s first National Security Advisor, was sitting in a courtroom, where among other matters a tentative date was set for his sentencing, John Bolton, the third person to occupy that position, was given the boot.

Goodbye Summer, Hello Courthouse

Time to come ashore and get back to work, reluctantly. In Boston last week for the latest episode of the Hollywood college admissions scandal, this time featuring Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli. They appeared before US magistrate judge M. Page Kelley for a Rule 44 hearing concerning possible conflicts in their representation by counsel. I expect to be back in Boston next week for the sentencing of Felicity Huffman who pleaded guilty in May, admitting she paid $15,000 to arrange for cheating on her daughter’s SAT test.