Blog Archives

Remembering Tim Russert

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Tim was my boss.  After a terrible personal tragedy just about exactly a year ago he was one of the first persons to come by my office, close the door, and offer some words of comfort.

I admired him and was proud to work for him.  The sketch shows him on the witness stand during the Scooter Libby trial.  He did an impressive job holding his own during two days of very aggressive questioning by Libby’s lawyer.

I will miss him.

Posted in Courtroom, History Tagged with: ,

Go Directly to Jail, do not pass go, do not collect $200

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Judge Reggie Jackson was not swayed by arguments made by Lawrence S. Robbins, a member of his newly formed appellate team of attorneys, seeking to allow Scooter Libby to defer serving his thirty month sentence until his appeals are exhausted.

Washington Post story here.

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Libby sentenced

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This sketch shows I.Lewis “Scooter” Libby standing, flanked by his attorneys, before Judge Reggie Walton as he receives his sentence: 30 months and $250,000.

Whether he starts serving his sentence in the near future or gets to remain free on bail until his appeals are exhausted will be decided by the judge next Thursday at another hearing.

Washington Post story here.

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Libby II, the civil suit

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Lawyers for “Scooter” Libby, Vice President Cheney, Karl Rove and Richard Armitage today asked a judge to dismiss the lawsuit by former covert CIA officer Valerie Plame and her husband, former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV for harm caused by the outing of Ms Plame in retaliation for Ambassador Wilson’s criticism of the White House case for invading Iraq. In the sketch above Valerie Plame is seated in the left foreground while Rove’s attorney, Bob Luskin makes his argument.

It’s hard to do justice, with pencil and paint,  to Valerie Plame; she’s quite striking.Plame070517_Chemerinsky

Here she is with her attorney, Duke law professor Erwin Chemerinsky (who is not quite so).

Washington Post story here.

Posted in Courtroom Tagged with: ,

VERDICT

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The jury announced their verdict, guilty on 4 of 5 counts, shortly after noon. Libby, shown seated with his lawyers, betrayed no emotion. Left to right are: Alex Borrelli, foreground, Ted Wells, Libby, and William Jeffress.

Washington Post story is here.

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Notes from the jury

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The jury in the Scooter Libby sent out notes containing two questions before they  recessed on Friday.  The above sketch shows the lawyers for the government, in the left foreground, and the defense, right background, huddling to discuss how Judge Walton ought to reply from their respective interests.

AP story here.

Posted in Courtroom Tagged with:

… and day seven

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The last note from the jury was not encouraging: “We would like another big Post-it pad.  The large one for the easel.” (someone thought it read ‘the foreperson is a weasel’)

The AP’s Matt Apuzzo has the story here.

Posted in Courtroom Tagged with:

Day six

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Last evening we were notified that the jury had sent out a note with a question. This was the scene this morning as everyone waited in the hallway for the courtroom to be opened at the conclusion of an unrelated, sealed matter.

The questioned was about count three, concerning a conversation Libby had with Matt Cooper, but before the judge could reply the jury said never mind.

Washington Post story here.

Posted in Courtroom Tagged with:

Day five jury deliberations

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As the jury deliberates behind closed doors reporters, lawyers, friends and the curious paced the sixth floor hallway.  I saw Libby framed in the doorway to the sunny new courthouse annex talking on his cell-phone.

Posted in Courtroom Tagged with:

Libby juror dismissed

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The Libby jury is now down to eleven not too angry men and women after one of the jurors was exposed, innocently the judge said, to outside information.

The dismissed juror, described by some as the haughty Grand Dame, is a retired curator of prints and drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with a patrician manner and a peculiarity of speech where she slowly, enunciates, every, word, she, utters. She was also the sole juror who did not don a red, heart emblazoned tee-shirt for Valentine’s day.

The feeling among the court watchers is that deliberations may move along more expeditiously now that she is gone.

Washington Post story here.

Posted in Courtroom Tagged with: ,
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