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Three Opinions Today . . .

. . . thirteen yet to come (counting the two cell-phone search cases as one).

In Argentina v. NML Capital the Court sided with investors seeking to locate Argentina’s overseas assets in order to collect on bonds that went into default. Justice Scalia wrote for the majority while Justice Ginsburg, pictured here on the right, was the sole dissenter.

Justice Kagan, above, had the opinion in Abramski v. U.S., a case concerning “straw purchasers” of firearms. And Justice Thomas, below,  announced the unanimous opinion in Susan B. Anthony List v. Driehaus that state laws criminalizing false statements made about a candidate in an election can be challenged on First Amendment grounds even before anyone is actually prosecuted.

 

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , , , ,

Argentina and POM Wonderful

The Supreme Court heard two cases today, the first day April’s two-week argument session after which the Court will only sit to deliver this term’s opinions.

The first case, Argentina v. NML Capital, concerns Argentina’s default on bonds the government issued in 1997, and stopped repayments when the domestic economy tanked in 2001. The issue before the Court is how far can creditors go in searching for assets.

The second argument, POM Wonderful v. Coca-Cola, is about truth-in-labeling. Was Coca-Cola guilty of false advertising under the Lanham Act when it labeled its product “Pomegranate Blueberry” even though it was mostly apple juice with only 0.3% pomegranate and 0.2% blueberry? POM Wonderful, which grows and sells pomegranate products, especially juice, thinks so.

The two sides certainly brought the heavy-hitters, former Solicitor General Seth Waxman and Stanford Law professor Kathleen Sullivan, to the lectern.

Though, not everyone found the arguments riveting.

Posted in Arguments, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , ,
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