Blog Archives

Sketches of announcement of Supreme Court opinions

Class Action and Global Warming

As the Supreme Court comes into the final stretch of the term opinions on some of the eagerly awaited bigger cases are coming down.  SC110620_Scalia

Today Justice Scalia delivered the opinion in Wal-Mart v. Dukes, the largest ever class-action suit.  Brought by female employees of the retail giant it accused Wal-Mart of sex discrimination in pay and promotion.  Not surprisingly Wal-Mart won.

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The other opinion on my watch list to come down today, American Electric Power Co. v. Conn., did not get as much attention.  In an opinion written by Justice Ginsburg the Court said that the regulation of greenhouse gases is the job of the EPA, and that States cannot make an end run around the Clean Air Act by filling a “public nuisance” claim in federal court.

ScotusBlog’s Lyle Denniston on the global warming case can be found here.

NYT article on Wal-Mart is here.

 

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Children and Miranda

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Justice Sotomayor : “It is beyond dispute that children will often feel bound to submit to police questioning when an adult in the same circumstances would feel free to leave.”

The case is J.D.B. v. North Carolina.

AP story here.

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , ,

$290 Million Ruling Against Microsoft

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Justice Sotomayor read her opinion for the Court in the patent-law case, Microsoft v. i4i Limited Partnership, which upheld the lower court judgement against the software giant.

The reaction in Redmond? : “Check under the couch cushions and pay them”.

Financial Times story here.

 

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , ,

Narrow Ruling on Material Witness Law

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In his opinion for the Court finding that former Attorney General John Ashcroft could not be sued for improper use of the material witness law in the detention of Abudulla al-Kidd, onetime University of Idaho football star, born Lavoni T. Kidd, Justice Scalia wrote :

“Qualified immunity gives government officials breathing room to make reasonable but mistaken judgments about open legal questions, when properly applied it protects all but the plainly incompetent or those who knowingly violate the law.

“Ashcroft deserves neither label.”

In a unanimous decision the Justices did not rule on the Fourth Amendment issue of unreasonable search and seizure, an area that acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal barely touched on during oral arguments in March.

The case is Ashcroft v. al-Kidd.

Lyle Denniston’s take on SCOTUSblog is here.

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , ,

Justices Dive Into Arizona Illegal Labor Pool

In the first of Arizona’s recently enacted laws aimed at curbing illegal immigration the Supreme Court supported the rights of states to pass laws such as the Legal Arizona Workers Act which withdraws licensing from businesses that employ illegals.

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The opinion, written by Chief Justice Roberts, turned on whether the Arizona law is a “licensing law” that escapes the federal preemption doctrine.

The case is Chamber of Commerce, et al. v. Whiting, et al.

Another Arizona law, one that gives police the authority to detain and arrest anyone suspected of being an unlawful alien, is working it’s way to the Supreme Court.

Andrew Cohen writes about all of it here.

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: ,

Release Valve Opened on Prison Overcrowding

The Supreme Court today upheld the release of over 30,000 prisoners in California as one remedy for overcrowding.  Justice Kennedy delivered the opinion in the bitterly divided, 5-4, case : Brown v. Plata  ( formerly Schwarzenegger  v. Plata when argued November 30, 2010 ). SC110523sketch_Kennedy
As is becoming more common in cases where there is sharp disagreement Justice Scalia read his pungent – adjective stolen from NYT’s Liptak - dissent from the bench as Kennedy – on the right below – stared straight ahead. SC110523sketch_Scalia

Andrew Cohen has written about the Court’s decision and the long simmering issue of growing prisoner population here.

 

 

 

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , ,

Taxpayers Lose Standing

In a 5-4 decision the Supreme Court today ruled that ordinary citizens cannot challenge an Arizona program that gave a dollar-for-dollar credit to taxpayers who donated to a School Tuition Organizations, or STOs, which in turn direct money to religious activities.SC110404_Kennedy

In reading the opinion of the Court, Justice Kennedy said the taxpayers lacked “standing“.

Bloomberg has story here.

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , , ,

Roberts Court Not So Business Friendly

Until recently the Supreme Court under Chief Justice Roberts has had a reputation of being friendly to business, but in two decisions delivered today the court continues a recent trend of rulings less favorable to business.

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In the first opinion, authored by Justice Sotomayor, a unanimous Court said that stockholders could sue the makers of Zicam nasal spray.

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And in a 6-2 opinion ( Justice Kagan took no part ) Justice Breyer wrote that a worker at a plastics factory was protected from retaliatory actions.

Click here for Robert Barnes’ WaPo article.

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I stuck around to hear/watch arguments in a case,  Borough of Duryea v. Guarnieri, concerning the First Amendment’s petition clause.  Some of the historical precedent cited reached back as far as Robin Hood’s Sherwood Forest.   Respondent’s lawyer, Eric Schnapper :  “If you had a problem in England, if the undersheriff took your cow, you could go to the sheriff, but historically, that wasn’t called a petition.  If you went to the king, that was a petition,”

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Now that’s entertainment!

Posted in Arguments, Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , ,

Court Opens the Door a Crack on DNA Testing for Prisoners

A sketch of Justice Ginsburg reading her opinion in Skinner v. Switzer :

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WaPo story here.

Posted in Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , , ,

Also at the Court

While the big news a the Supreme Court today was the decision in Snyder v. Phelps, arguments in another of this term’s big cases was being heard : Ashcroft v. Al-Kidd.

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Abudulla al-Kidd, formerly Lavni T. Kidd, was born and raised in the U.S. and converted to Islam while in college. He has never had ties to any terrorist organization, yet in 2003 he was arrested as he was about to board a plane for Saudi Arabia where he planned to study.  He was held as a material witness for fifteen days, but never asked to testify, nor was he ever charged with a crime.  Al-Kidd filed suit against then Attorney General John Ashcroft, saying that the the improper use of the material witness statute violated his Fourth Amendment rights.

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Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal barely touched on the Fourth Amendment, arguing that the Attorney General should have absolute immunity from such suits.

Found the story on CP ( The Canadian Press ) here.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Arguments, Opinions, Supreme Court Tagged with: , ,
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