Deaf and Hard of Hearing Admissions To The Bar

iPads and smartphones are not normally permitted in the courtroom but an exception was made for members of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Bar Association at the Supreme Court on Tuesday for the swearing in ceremony. American Sign Language interpreters were also present, seated in front of the bench right below Justice Kagan.

After the lawyers were presented Chief Justice Roberts used sign-language granting the motion to admit them to the bar. I wasn’t able to actually see the Chief signing as my view was blocked by the lawyers standing in front of me.

I also sketched the argument in United States v. Bryant.

Art Lien
About

Courtartist is me, Art Lien. I've been sketching the courts since 1976, and for most of that time the U.S. Supreme Court has been my regular beat. I've been working almost exclusively for NBC News since 1980. Courtroom sketching is a form of visual journalism or reportage drawing that is slowly dying out. Where once upon a time news organization each had their own artist covering a story, today a "pool" artist often sketches for all. It is a demanding and stressful discipline where the drawing is often done directly and under tight deadline.

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One comment on “Deaf and Hard of Hearing Admissions To The Bar
  1. ANNA says:

    WONDERFUL, THE PHYSICALLY DISABLED WERE WARMLY, COMPASSIONATELY WELCOMED BY THE SUPREME COURT:)

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