The Hapless Bank Robber

While it poured outside the Supreme Court yesterday morning the Justices inside heard arguments about a statute that imposes a minimum ten year sentence on a bank robber who “forces another person to accompany him”.

Larry Whitfield and an accomplice, armed with an AK-47 and a .357, tried to rob a Gastonia, North Carolina credit union but were foiled by a metal detector that automatically locked the bulletproof lobby doors. Fleeing in a Crown Victoria they crashed into the median. Whitfield got away, while his accomplice was caught.

The would-be bank robber, who had ditched his firearm, first broke into a vacant house but when the owner showed up he threatened her with a knife and ran. Next, he entered the home of 79-year-old Mary Parnell. He forced Parnell to accompany him a few feet into a room where he called and texted a friend, telling a terrified Parnell, “Ma’am, just calm down. I’m probably more scared than you are, and I’m actually just trying to leave.”

Mary Parnell was having a heart attack and died. Whitfield got 20 years for the robbery plus five for forcing Parnell to accompany him to the other room.

The case is Whitfield v. U.S.

Read Amy Howe’s SCOTUSblog account of the argument here.

 

 

 

 

Art Lien
About

Courtartist is me, Art Lien. I've been sketching the courts since 1976, and for most of that time the U.S. Supreme Court has been my regular beat. I've been working almost exclusively for NBC News since 1980. Courtroom sketching is a form of visual journalism or reportage drawing that is slowly dying out. Where once upon a time news organization each had their own artist covering a story, today a "pool" artist often sketches for all. It is a demanding and stressful discipline where the drawing is often done directly and under tight deadline.

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