An Emotional Day

Detective Lisa Reeves took the witness stand Friday and told the jury how she had brought Huguely from his apartment to the police station for questioning as a potential witness. Noticing that Huguely’s knuckles were severely bruised and that he had a fresh cut on his arm she came to have a “reasonable suspicion that he may have committed this crime”. Huguely120211wide

The interview was videotaped, and the taped played in court. Huguely, sounding still a bit inebriated, admits to drinking all day long the previous day and going over to Yeardley Love’s apartment around 12:45 p.m. “to talk” after an incident the week before when Yeardley went to his apartment and hit him with her purse, accusing him of texting other girls. On the videotape Huguely describes what happened at Yeardley’s apartment over and over for about thirty minutes telling the detective that Yeardley was “freaking out” and “got really aggressive”. He admits shaking her and throwing her on the bed before leaving the apartment.Huguely120210wide

Finally Detective Reeves says “I have to tell you something. She’s dead. You killed her.” After a long silence Hugulely says “she’s dead . . . HOW?” The detective responds “I think you know” Huguely then becomes very upset saying “she’s dead? how the fuck is she dead? She’s dead?…she’s dead?…she’s dead?? I don’t believe it…I didn’t hurt her…I don’t believe she’s dead…I want to see her!” Huguely120210_weep

In the courtroom Huguley began to weep, wiping away tears. It was the first time during the trial that he has shown any emotion.

Huguely120210_Flaherty

In the afternoon Detective Michael Flaherty was called to testify and introduce into evidence photos and items taken from the crime scene including the apartment door that Huguely broke through. Huguely120210_family

As the detective described photos of the body laying on the floor Yeardley’s sister Lexie wept as her fiancee tried to comfort her.

Many others in the courtroom were overcome with emotion as well.

WaPo story here.

 

 

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Courtartist is me, Art Lien. I've been sketching the courts since 1976, and for most of that time the U.S. Supreme Court has been my regular beat. I've been working almost exclusively for NBC News since 1980. Courtroom sketching is a form of visual journalism or reportage drawing that is slowly dying out. Where once upon a time news organization each had their own artist covering a story, today a "pool" artist often sketches for all. It is a demanding and stressful discipline where the drawing is often done directly and under tight deadline.

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