This Week’s SCOTUS Sketches

Three arguments: Currier v. Virginia, City of Hays v. Vogtand Dahda v. United StatesFour opinions: Murphy v. SmithRubin v. Islamic Republic of Iran, Class v. United States, and Digital Realty Trust, Inc. v. Somers. No biggies.

 

 

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This Week’s SCOTUS Sketches

The Supreme Court heard arguments in four cases this week ( Monday was Martin Luther King, Jr. Day ), three of which I sketched.

Tuesday’s argument in Dalmazzi v. United States was a fairly esoteric, at least to me, discussion on military judges serving simultaneously on two courts. The question of whether the Supreme Court even has jurisdiction over executive branch military courts was also raised.

First up on Wednesday was Encino Motorcars v. Navarro, about overtime pay for service advisors at car dealerships. Exciting, I know. But one thing did make it a bit more interesting to draw, a pair of sign-language interpreters were present for the swearing in of members of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Bar Association. Members of that bar were also able to follow the arguments on handheld devices.

More lively and interesting was Wednesday’s second case, and the last argument of the January sitting, McCoy v. Louisiana, in which death row inmate Robert McCoy argues that he should get a new trial because his own lawyer told jurors he was guilty.

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Ohio Voter Roll Purge

Here are three sketches from yesterday’s argument in Husted v. A.Philip Randolph Institute on whether the method Ohio uses to purge its voter registration list violates the federal motor voter law.

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Fourth Amendment Day

The justices heard arguments today in two cases arising from warrantless searches. The first, Byrd v. United States, looks at whether an unapproved driver of a rental car has a reasonable expectation of privacy.

The second case, Collins v. Virginia, brings us to the word of the day, “curtilage”, as in do the police need a warrant to look under the tarp concealing the motorcycle parked on your curtilage?

To get the flavor of today’s arguments check out Mark Walsh’s “view” from the courtroom.

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Original Jurisdiction Day

Despite the frigid temperature this morning people lined up for a seat to hear arguments involving water rights. The Supreme Court acts as a kind of trial court for disputes between the States in what are called original jurisdiction cases because they originate here instead of coming from the lower courts.

The cases heard today were Texas v. New Mexico and Colorado and Florida v. Georgia.

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2017’s Leftover SCOTUS Sketches

Don’t know why I never posted this SCOTUSblog Halloween sketch. It’s a good one I think.

Another banner I neglected to post was inspired by the sports betting case, Christie v. NCAAI also failed to post the sketches from the argument and governor Christie’s swearing in to the bar.

I may be forgiven, it was a tough week. My mother was dying and I needed to be with her. That’s why I missed the arguments in Masterpiece Cakeshopthough I did produce a banner.

. . . with apologies to Wayne Thiebaud.

 

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This Week’s SCOTUS Sketches

Monday was patent day at the Supreme Court with arguments in two cases, Oil States Energy Services v. Greene’s Energy Group and SAS Institute Inc. v. Matal, related to a provision of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act aimed at keeping patent troll lawsuits out of court.

 

Wednesday’s argument, Carpenter v. United Stateswas a biggie on cellphone search warrants.

 

 

 

 

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Benghazi Trial Goes To The Jury

A DC jury is to begin deliberations Monday after seven weeks of hearing evidence and arguments in the trial of accused Benghazi master mind Ahmed Abu Khattala. He faces 18 charges including murder and conspiracy for the September 2012 attack on the U.S. embassy in which Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and aide Sean Smith were killed.

I only attended the first day of trial where I sketched opening statements and the first witness, Ambassador Stevens’ bodyguard Scott Wickland (the caption on my sketch is misspelled). Too bad because from what I’ve read it was a fascinating trail. You can read about it here.

Another Lybian charged in the attack, Mustafa al-Imam, was recently captured by U.S. Special Ops and appeared before a judge in the same courthouse earlier this month.

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Another Manafort Monday

Well, only one of these sketches is from today’s bail review hearing, the other two are from last Thursday.

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Manafort Monday

Word got out over the weekend that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation had yielded at least one indictment, and that an arrest and court appearance were imminent, so Monday morning the media descended on the DC federal courthouse.

It wasn’t long before we learned that Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, and his business partner Rick Gates, were going to appear before magistrate judge Deborah Robinson later that afternoon.

Manafort and Gates appeared to be handcuffed as they entered the courtroom, both with their hands behind their backs, but in fact the cuffs had just been removed before they came in.

Manafort and Gates are due back in court tomorrow, Thursday.

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