Roger Stone Back In Court

Ex-Trump campaign adviser and self-described dirty trickster Roger Stone made his first appearance yesterday before the judge in charge of his case. Judge Amy Berman Jackson said she is considering a gag order but that it wouldn’t prevent the parties from commenting about “immigration, foreign relations, or Tom Brady”.

No trial date set, but the prosecution is looking to October. Next status hearing scheduled for March 14.

A little disappointed that Stone didn’t flash the Nixon victory gesture in the courtroom, though he did for the cameras outside the courthouse.

Tagged with: , , ,

Roger Stone Arraignment

A circus was expected but it turned out to be a routine, though well attended, fifteen minute arraignment. Stone will be back in court on Friday for a hearing before judge Amy Berman Jackson.

Tagged with: , , , , ,

Meanwhile Manafort . . .

The indictment and early morning arrest of Roger Stone overshadowed Paul Manafort’s appearance in a DC courtroom yesterday. Manafort chose not to be there but judge Amy Berman Jackson insisted he attend the hearing over his lack of cooperation with the Special Counsel.

Leaning heavily on a cane as he walked into the courtroom, his hair a bit more gray, Manafort is looking old and tired.

The hearing will continue next week but under seal, behind closed doors so no sketches. However, on Tuesday Roger Stone will be at the DC courthouse for arraignment, and I wouldn’t want to miss that.

 

Tagged with: , ,

A Quiet January Sitting Wrap Up

January has been a bit of a snooze at the Supreme Court but I did get to learn about the Dormant Commerce Clause ( Tennessee Wine & Spirits Retailers v. Blair ).

There was plenty of other news from the Court today: cert denial in a school prayer case, cert granted in a Second Amendment case to be heard next term, stay grants in a pair of transgender cases, and action on the Mueller mystery grand jury subpoena. But from the bench just one 9-0 opinion from Justice Thomas in a patent case.

Below are some sketches from some of last week’s arguments and opinions. Fingers crossed that Justice Ginsburg will be back on the bench after the mid-winter break.

 

Tagged with:

Missing Justice Ginsburg

Justice Ginsburg was absent from the bench this week, recovering from recent surgery. She will continue to work from home next week, participating in the cases argued through transcripts and the briefs. Her odds of making a full recovery are good, and I’m looking forward to seeing her back on the bench for the February sitting.

No blockbusters this week. I sketched three of the arguments, one each day. Monday’s focused on whether the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act applies to law firms acting as “debt collector” in nonjudicial foreclosures; exciting stuff.

Of more interest, at least to this sketch artist, and something I could make into a SCOTUSblog banner was Tuesday’s Indian treaty argument.

Several members of the Crow Tribe were present in the courtroom to for the arguments in Herrera v. Wyoming.

Interesting that Samuel Enemy-Hunter, pictured here in the right background, was allowed to wear tribal head-dress in the courtroom while in November, when Carpenter v. Murphy was argued, court personnel made an official of the Muscogee Creek Nation remove his.

And finally, I had no idea that Wednesday’s argument, Franchise Tax Board of California v. Hyatt, was such a big deal but evidently for constitution nerds, whom I admire, this case is their meat and potatoes.

Tagged with: , , , , ,

“I’m Not Hiding My Disgust”

A crowd of supporters showed up for what was expected to be a lenient sentencing for former national security advisor Michael Flynn, some no doubt hoping the judge would criticize the government for coming close to entrapment. But in an unexpected twist Judge Sullivan, who is known for holding government officials to a higher standard, instead focused his ire on the defendant.

“He was a high-ranking government official, advising the president of the United States,” Sullivan said. “I’m not hiding my disgust, my disdain, for this criminal offense.”

After repeatedly rebuking Flynn and having him admit on the record that he knew when he lied to the FBI that he was breaking the law, Judge Sullivan recessed the hearing so that Flynn could consult with his lawyers and decide if he wanted to continue with sentencing and almost certainly go to jail or continue cooperating with the government in the prosecution of his former business partners, and face sentencing at a later date. Flynn chose to postpone sentencing.

 

 

 

 

Tagged with: , , ,

Maria Butina’s Guilty Plea

Russia is just as gun crazy as the U.S. so why not make connections and alliances with the NRA as a way to influence American policy? It was a good plan and Maria Butina sounded proud of her efforts as she entered a plea of guilty in federal court this week. Her answers to the judge’s questions were remarkably rapid and crisp, almost as if she were responding to a drill sergeant.

 

Tagged with: , ,

What is “Separate Sovereigns”, Alex?

Answer: an exception to the double-jeopardy rule.

Here are a few sketches from Thursday’s argument in Gamble v. United States where Terance Gamble challenges his prosecution and conviction for the same offense in both state and federal court despite the Fifth Amendment’s rule that  no “person [shall] be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb.”

Tagged with: , ,

This Week’s SCOTUS Sketches

On Monday the justices heard argument over whether an antitrust lawsuit brought by iPhone users unhappy that apps may only be purchased through the Apple store can move forward. Apple claims it does not have a monopoly because it is the app developers who set the prices.

Tuesday saw argument about who owns Oklahoma brought by members of the Muscogee Creek Nation.

Wednesday’s only case was about seizure of assets upon criminal conviction in state court and whether that violates the Eighth Amendment’s ban on excessive fines.

Tagged with: , , , , ,

Sketches From The November Sitting

Just posting November’s SCOTUS sketches ( I missed the first couple days, so starting on October 31 ) without comments except to note that the election day SCOTUSblog banner at the end of this post is a work of “artistic license.” We know, from his confirmation hearing testimony, that Justice Kavanaugh does not vote, and I expect that may be the case for other justices as well.

 

 

Tagged with: , ,
Top